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Forums Round Tables General Career Discussions Re: Ethics: Turning down job offers when you've already agreed Revision History (1 edit)
Re: Ethics: Turning down job offers when you've already agreed (response to post by dok)
At that point, we've probably stopped interviewing other candidates, and starting assigning work. It's really quite a problem.


Is it really quite a problem? (I'm probably gonna lost some bridges here.. :-)) In my experience the most additional problem is paperwork and having to call the other next available candidate that they are accepted. That's quite trivial IMO. But your mileage may varies depending how large your company is or how demanding labour regulation in your place.

The worst problem I experienced is the mixed feelings of a little betrayal (you just abandon all of our commitment), insult (I have admitted I need you but you don't want me), disappointment (it's gonna be nice working with you but you won't be working with me). In summary, I feel that the bridge they burn is of a personal level. That's why I begin to appreciate candidate who take the time and effort to reject me personally and unharshly, especially after I have personally accepted them.

As long as they ask permission to left and I allow it, I don't consider that as a lack of commitment. Yes, I will be more cautious when hiring him/her in the future and I will probably have limit on how much I'm going to like him/her, but (s)he is committed enough to ask for agreement to abandon commitment. Asking permission and I don't allow it but (s)he insist, now that starts to count as damaging the bridge. But the one way breaking of an already agreed commitment is not enough to justify burning the bridge.

Edit: Clarification.
Re: Ethics: Turning down job offers when you've already agreed (response to post by dok)
At that point, we've probably stopped interviewing other candidates, and starting assigning work. It's really quite a problem.


Is it really quite a problem? (I'm probably gonna lost some bridges here.. :-)) In my experience the most additional problem is paperwork and having to call the other next available candidate that they are accepted. That's quite trivial IMO. But your mileage may varies depending how large your company is or how demanding labour regulation in your place.

The most problem I experienced is the mixed feelings of a little betrayal (you just abandon all of our commitment), insult (I have admitted I need you but you don't want me), disappointment (it's gonna be nice working with you but you won't be working with me). In summary, I feel that the bridge they burn is of a personal level. That's why I begin to appreciate candidate who take the time and effort to reject me personally and unharshly, especially after I have personally accepted them.

As long as they ask permission to left and I allow it, I don't consider that as a lack of commitment. Yes, I will be more cautious when hiring him/her in the future and I will probably have limit on how much I'm going to like him/her. Asking permission and I don't allow it but (s)he insist, now that starts to count as damaging the bridge.