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Forums Round Tables General Career Discussions Re: Answers to Most Common Interview Questions Revision History (1 edit)
Re: Answers to Most Common Interview Questions (response to post by Minilek)
If you ask what final does in Java or using in C# is it a memorization-type of question? When I was asked the latter I didn't mind. These type of questions can be used by the interviewer after he decides you should be hired in order to get an idea about what is the best team for you to work with at the start. Learning a new technology can be time-consuming and it makes no sense to put you in a team that badly needs X skills right NOW.

But I wholeheartedly agree that if they seem to take a decision for hire/no-hire based on that type of questions something is really wrong. Most questions of good employers are geared towards figuring out how you think. An example of why technology-oriented questions are stupid is my experience with Brainbench. I took the C# test on a boring day after reading about the language for about four hours and before writing my first line of C# code. I got in the 94 percentile and the title `master'. In fact, it was a boring week so I did the same with the XML (97%) and XML concepts (93%) tests. I've used C# afterwards but never XML. If I would go to an interview now and I would be asked about XML I would say that I've read about it but never used it.

PS Mysterious Ways: I just got an email, while writing this, from Brainbench with the subject "you are invited to participate in an elite IT research panel". Should I peek or delete right away?

edit: BTW, Joel Spolsky has a blog post on interviews. What do you think about his opinion on aha! questions?
Re: Answers to Most Common Interview Questions (response to post by Minilek)
If you ask what final does in Java or using in C# is it a memorization-type of question? When I was asked the latter I didn't mind. These type of questions can be used by the interviewer after he decides you should be hired in order to get an idea about what is the best team for you to work with at the start. Learning a new technology can be time-consuming and it makes no sense to put you in a team that badly needs X skills right NOW.

But I wholeheartedly agree that if they seem to take a decision for hire/no-hire based on that type of questions something is really wrong. Most questions of good employers are geared towards figuring out how you think. An example of why technology-oriented questions are stupid is my experience with Brainbench. I took the C# test on a boring day after reading about the language for about four hours and before writing my first line of C# code. I got in the 94 percentile and the title `master'. In fact, it was a boring week so I did the same with the XML (97%) and XML concepts (93%) tests. I've used C# afterwards but never XML. If I would go to an interview now and I would be asked about XML I would say that I've read about it but never used it.

PS Mysterious Ways: I just got an email, while writing this, from Brainbench with the subject "you are invited to participate in an elite IT research panel". Should I peek or delete right away?